USFSP ANTHROPOLOGY

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Required
ANT 2000 Intro to Anthropology -(4) is not required but can count toward the credits needed for the major and is a wonderful introduction to the field.
Instructors: Dr. J. Arthur, Dr. K. Arthur or adjunct

Anthropology is the study of human biology, society, material life, and language. This course is a four credit class designed to present the subfields of American anthropology. Specifically, I use class lectures, assigned readings, and films to enhance your understanding of Biological Anthropology, Archaeology, Socio-cultural Anthropology, and Linguistic Anthropology. Anthropology brings to the forefront an enhanced awareness and understanding of human similarities and differences essential for people preparing to take their place in the increasingly interconnected world of the twenty-first century. I hope that you take with you a better understanding of the universal human characteristics as well as a tolerance for diversity in human physiology, language, and culture.

ANT 2410 Cultural Anthropology (3)
Instructors: Dr. Sokolovsky, Dr. K. Arthur or adjunct

This course is designed to expose students to cultural diversity. Specifically, I use class lectures, assigned readings, and films to enhance your understanding of cultural anthropology. The first third of this course will provide students with: a basic definition of cultural anthropology, research and field methods, ethics, the concepts of culture and how people acquire culture, and the history of anthropological theories of culture. In the remaining portion of the class, we will explore anthropological issues through the study of several specific cultures including: the Yanomamo, Trobriand Islanders, Navajo/Dene, Khoisan, Central African foragers, Gamo, Konso, Maasai, and the Wodaabe. The second part of the course will focus on the symbolic aspects and interpersonal relationships that affect everyday life including: language, material culture, kinship, gender, and religion. In the last weeks of class, we will discuss the different means by which anthropologists universally study and organize human societies including political, social, and economic systems through global and temporal lens. We will especially focus on how these relationships have altered with Western expansionism.

ANT 2511 Biological Anthropology (3)
Instructor:
Dr. Dixon

Students in this course will discover how biological anthropology’s unifying themes of culture, adaptation and evolution weave together the threads of these diverse practices. You will experience how anthropologists, like other scientists, collect and analyze data, using the scientific method. To that end, you will complete laboratory exercises in comparative anatomy and genetics as well as conducting your own field exercises in the observation of primate behavior. You will gain an understanding of how anthropology’s interdisciplinary perspective fits into the broader practices of the natural and social sciences.
ANT 3101 Archaeology (3)
Instructor:
Dr. J. Arthur

Archaeology is the general introductory survey course to world archaeology. This course will focus on the major cultural events in human prehistory: 1) human evolution; 2) the population of the different continents by modern humans; 3) the origins and development of food production; and 4) the development of complex societies. We will explore and contrast the different geographical regions in terms of the four major cultural developments, providing a general overview and understanding of world prehistory.

ANT 3610 Anthropological Linguistics (3) ANT 3610 Anthropological Linguistics (3)
Instructor: Dr. Schmidt

This course follows a seminar format and is designed to introduce students to the comparative study of language in its cultural and social contexts, giving special attention to issues of class, gender, and ethnicity. Besides providing a basic understanding of various approaches to language and culture, this course also focuses on the role of language as a tool of power. Finally, this course is aimed at teaching students to think critically. Developing critical thinking includes learning to differentiate sources of information (facts, opinions, and theories) and understanding the premises and implications of ideas. Organizing information and ideas you gather through the readings and discussions is an important step in the process of critical thinking.

ANT 4034 Theories of Culture (3)
Instructor: 
Dr. Sokolovsky

This course will introduce students to the intellectual history of anthropology and broad scope of the theoretical foundations of this field. It will require students to understand styles of writing and thinking which now seem out of date and antiquated, but must be understood in the historical and cultural contexts in which they were produced.

Methods (3 hrs Required for Anthropology majors)

ANT 4495 Methods in Cultural Research (3)
Instructor:
Dr. Sokolovsky

This course is about doing qualitative based research on cultural systems. It will be carried out from the perspective of modern anthropology but also inform students about efforts in Sociology, Psychology and other social sciences to intensely examine cultural worlds.(3)
ANT 4114 Seminar in Archaeological Method and Theory (4)
Instructor:
Dr. J. Arthur

The purpose of the course is to give undergraduate students, who focus on archaeology, a preliminary understanding of basic archaeological methods and theories, which will help them in graduate studies and cultural resource management work. This course examines the major theoretical paradigms, which archaeologists use to infer meanings from the archaeological record. In the second part of the course, we will learn and practice different types of field methods and analyses of specific materials (i.e., ceramics, lithics, bone, etc.). We will visit archaeological sites in Florida and learn how to conduct basic mapping and excavation techniques.
ANT 4442 Urban Life and Culture (3)
Instructor:Dr. Sokolovsky

This course will analyze Urban Places, Urbanism and Urbanization through a world-wide comparative, anthropological and interdisciplinary approach. Through discussion, guest lectures, readings, films, slides and video tapes we will explore the urban experience in non-Western cultures and compare this with American and European urban life.

ANT 4935 Rethinking Anthropology (3)
Instructor: Dr. K. Arthur

This course is taught in a seminar format and will encourage students to rethink and evaluate current issues in the four-fields of American anthropology through readings and assignments. Students will be exposed to the experiences, voices, and practices of anthropologists in relationship to ethics, writing (articles, books, and grant proposals), film, and graduate school. In addition, we will create a dialogue grounding theoretical issues such as cultural relativism, race, globalism, development, gender, representation and symbolism.

ANT 4302 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3)
Instructor: Dr. Schmidt

This course follows a seminar format based on class discussions. It will focus on the social constructions of gender based on particular historical and cultural processes of four specific social formations (a. Pre-colonial societies; b. Agrarian societies; c. Pastoral societies; and d. State societies). The goal of this course is to give students the opportunity to explore the connections between different socio-economic formations and the gender systems they created through multiple ‘bargains with patriarchies.’ In fact, the ultimate goal of this course is to understand that gender systems are products of particular histories and particular peoples.

ANT 4312 North American Indians (3)
Instructor: Dr. J. Arthur

North American Indians is a general introductory survey course to Native American cultures. The course will focus on two main goals: (1) to understand the importance of Native American cultures to the larger North American community; and (2) to explore and distinguish the different impacts that have caused the dramatic cultural changes that have occurred over the last several centuries. We will investigate and contrast the different Native American cultures throughout North American, providing a general overview and understanding of North American Indians. The course will focus on topics that are affecting Native American cultures today, such as repatriation, environmental pollution, land rights, gaming, etc. The course will cover the traditional life-ways of different societies and how they have changed in the last two centuries.

Electives

ANT 4241 Anthropology of Religion (formerly Magic and Religion) (3)
Instructor: Dr. K. Arthur

A cross-cultural study of indigenous non-western religions. We will consider mystical beings and their associated mythologies and symbolic forms. Students will learn how religious practitioners as well as commoners communicate, honor, and embody their mystical beings through rituals of rites of passage, music, dance, healing, magic, “witchcraft”, and the mundane. We also will explore indigenous religions as they reflect contact between indigenous and global cultures in revitalization movements and syncretism.

ANT 4316 Ethnic Diversity in the United States (3)
Instructor: Dr. Schmidt

ANT 4316 is an exit course in Anthropology which will follow a seminar format based on class discussions. It will focus on ethnicity and ethnic diversity in the U.S. as social constructions that respond to specific moments in the history of the U.S. Focusing on specific case studies (Native American, African American, Asian American, Hispanics and white) this course affords students the opportunity to explore different theoretical perspectives dealing with the dynamics of history, class, and ethnicity in the U.S. Students will be encouraged to look at what specific national discourses express about ethnic, gender, and class realities and how these constructions reflect particular hegemonic interests.

ANT 4323 Mexico and Central America (3)
Instructor: Dr. Schmidt

ANT 4323 is an exit course in Anthropology which will follow a seminar format based on class discussions. It will focus on ethnicity and ethnic diversity in the U.S. as social constructions that respond to specific moments in the history of the U.S. Focusing on specific case studies (Native American, African American, Asian American, Hispanics and white) this course affords students the opportunity to explore different theoretical perspectives dealing with the dynamics of history, class, and ethnicity in the U.S. Students will be encouraged to look at what specific national discourses express about ethnic, gender, and class realities and how these constructions reflect particular hegemonic interests.

ANT 4432 The Individual and Culture (3)
Instructor: Dr. Sokolovsky

This is a wide-ranging course which will explore the intersection of culture, mind and human communities. While this is an anthropology class you will encounter readings from anthropology, psychology, sociology and history.

ANT 4462 Health, Illness, and Culture (3)
Instructor: Dr. Dixon

The study of health and human behavior in cross-cultural perspective. Main themes include: the impact of disease on the development of human culture; comparative studies of curing practices; medical systems in their relationship to ideology. Emphasis on understanding the role of medicine, and the behavior of both practitioners and patients in modern societies.

ANT 4352 Peoples of Africa (3)
Instructor: Dr. J. Arthur or Dr. K. Arthur

This course draws upon works in anthropology and related fields to dispel myths and stereotypes of Africa by addressing issues facing that continent today. The course will incorporate lectures, readings, and discussions focused on themes such as gender relations, the debate over the nature of indigenous cultures, health issues such AIDS and malaria, debt relief to countries, refugees and current conflicts that affect food acquisition and security, and a discussion on the multiple types of religion practiced in Africa.

ANT 4930 Women and Development in Latin America
Instructor: Dr. Schmidt

This course aims at exposing students to a wide array of gender issues brought by the changes in the local and global economies that particularly affect Latin American women’s understandings of their identities and roles in the communities they live. Measurable Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate knowledge about the role played by factors such as race, age, gender, ethnicity and economic status in the politics of modernization and development in rural communities in Latin America.

ANT 4153 North American Archaeology (3)
Instructor: Dr. J. Arthur

This course is an examination of the evidence for the origin and antiquity of human beings in North America and of patterns of regional development until the period of contact with European colonists. Lectures, readings, and discussions will emphasize the variation of cultures focusing on issues such as ecological adaptation, social, political, and religious systems, health, and the development of complex societies.
ANT 4176 Archaeology of Africa
Instructor: Dr. J. Arthur, Dr. K. Arthur

African Archaeology will critically examine the western myths of Africa as a “Dark Continent” inhabited by an unsophisticated peoples. First, we will explore the fossils that reveal Africa to be the home of the first people followed by the wonderful rock art and megaliths associated with the earliest food producers. Then, we will study the lives of the ancient pyramid builders of Egypt, the earliest Christian Kingdom in the Horn of Africa, and the gold and ivory traders of Southern Africa. The purpose of the course is to not only examine the spectacular prehistory and history of Africa, but also to provide a rich understanding of the diversity that is Africa.

ANT 4178 History and Archaeology of the African Diaspora
Instructor: Dr. K. Arthur

This course will focus on the rich contributions made by African peoples to lifeways outside its boarders. After first reviewing the history of African Diaspora studies, we will identify the earliest migrations of African peoples into Europe and Southwest Asia during the Paleolithic, Classical, and Proto-historic periods. Subsequently, we will explore the history and archaeology of interaction, cultural change and continuity on the African continent during the colonial period. We also will trace through archaeology, history, and ethnography the cross-cultural patterns of peoples of African descent living outside the African continent.

ANT 4586 Prehistoric Human Evolution (3)
Instructor: Dr. K. Arthur

This course will introduce you to the study of human evolution – Paleoanthropology . The story of our past can be found in clues from a wide range of sources — everything from details of primate behavior to art murals in Ice Age caves. We will begin with an introduction to the history of Paleoanthropological studies and comparative studies of other primates. We can learn a lot about ourselves by studying the bodies and behavior of non-human primates and human foragers and apply this knowledge to help interpret ancient evidence. We will dig into the past, to look at fossils and archaeological sites for the evidence revealing when and where our ancestors begin to walk upright, hunt and gather, use tools, invent art, speak and develop the wide range of social and cultural practices that we consider human. And throughout the semester, we will sift through the present to reveal how researchers construct current models and theories concerning human evolution.

ANT 4620 Language and Culture (3)
Instructor:Dr. Schmidt

This course has been designed to provide students with an opportunity to focus on contemporary issues of language and culture and the very complex influences they exert on our understanding of our daily lives. Besides focusing on theoretical considerations, this course affords students the opportunity of applying knowledge generated in class to the analysis of the role language plays in the construction of realities that are seen through the lenses of gender, class, ethnicity, and power and the effects words have in the readings and understandings of reality. Students will be encouraged to analyze the role of language in the media (radio, TV. Newspapers, ads) and the internet in the production and reproduction of ideologies and hegemonies in issues of representation and imposition. This course follows a seminar format.